[DNP!...yet] PART I ADKeBA approach

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[DNP!...yet] PART I ADKeBA approach

PostPosted by kaidan K » Thu Dec 15, 2011 3:40 am

[Look but no posty yet, please as this is very long to the point of where I'm splitting this lesson up with a couple replies or so to this topic. So, once again. DO NOT POST YET!]

ADKeBA as in "Action a Day Keeps Boredom Away".

In this lesson, I will breakdown and outline what I am calling the "Action a Day Keeps Boredom Away approach" to role play. It is named this way for the fact that this style focuses on that one description type I mentioned back in "Please DESCRIBE this for me!" topic to make role play posts more like movies and TV shows of this genre, ACTION!! Good action topics can be just like good action movies. Story is great to keep in mind so it isn't mindless chaos, but the main focus is making as much happen in a single post while making the action that happens as over the top as possible. By making the action over the top, that doesn't always mean that you need to make the action unbelievable, just well written enough to where it's entertaining for the reader. Naturally, this style of role play demands the most focus on Action and Physical Appearance descriptions that I outlined in detail in "Please DESCRIBE this for me!". Of course you also don't want to ignore Mentality description, and Purpose either because they can add a very needed plot-line to your action-packed role play. With this lesson, I will show a comparison between two examples again, then breakdown the specific techniques used when role playing the "ADkeBA" way.

Let's begin,


Example-1
Spoiler:
John notices Hans behind him. He turns around and hits Hans in the head.
"You should think twice about sneaking up on somebody!" says John. Hans hits John in the gut.
"You should think twice about fighting terrorists on your own, Mr. Cowboy." then replies Hans. They both point their guns at each other.
"Yippee-ki-yay, motherf#%@&er!" says John. Then an explosion took out the floor beneath them. Both Hans and John fall through the hole in the floor.


Here we have the most basic layout of an action scene post. The dialogue exchange is a little stimulating, but there's plenty of things missing to make it a more entertaining read.
Let's see the rewrite in Example-2,

Example-2
Spoiler:
As John was looking around frantically for him, he finally noticed Hans out of the corner of his eye, right behind him. The veteran cop spun 'round with his fist shooting through the air. SMACK! Right in Hans' face!
"You shold think twice about sneaking up on somebody!" John mentioned with a serious look on his face that was wet with blood and sweat. Hans simply returned the blow with a knee to John's stomach, making him wince in pain. Hans no longer cared if he ruined his suit, even by touching John's red stained, sweat towel of a tank-top with it.
"You should think twice about fighting terrorists on your own, Mr. Cowboy." Hans then replied verbally in a snide tone. John noticed Hans' gun, so he quickly recovered himself and reached for his own. As they pointed their guns at each other, a sly look came on John's face and he smiled.
"Yippee-ki-yay, motherf#%@&er!" he said before a massive explosion took out the floor beneath them both.
"Like clockwork." John thought to himself last before he and Hans plummeted through the floor below them.


Now look at how much more you get to see and almost feel in this rewrite? Not bad, eh? There's several things to take note in what I did here. First, not only did "John see Hans", but we now can see that he "was looking around frantically for him". That and I put in the "out of the corner of his eye" detail in there to spruce up the action description a bit. Then when John goes to punch Hans, I threw in a little word play; first describing John a little further than just by calling him 'John', and then instead of just saying that he "hits Hans in the head" I made a more intense description of John going through the motions of hitting Hans. Going yet even further, I through in an 'EOD', Exclamation Outside of Dialogue. When you watch or read an action scene, you expect for their to be sound effects. Just like a movie would be a lot less interesting to watch without good sound effects, so a good action read would be without some kind of sound description in it where applicable. In this case, I try and draw the reader in with an exclamation sound effect, "SMACK!" and with that I can bring the reader into the scene through better visualization of what's going on in the writing. Then the dialogue comes in. It's pretty engaging conversation, wouldn't you say? But what makes it better now is the detail given about how the characters look. We catch a glimpse of what they're both wearing; John's got a tank-top on, while Hans is in a suit. There's more detail given being that John's tank-top is "red stained"(stained with blood), and there's even a comment about Hans' feelings towards touching it with his suit. More detail about facial and even verbal expressions give this dialogue more visualization for the reader as now they can tell the tone of voice intended, and a little insight to the explosion. It's implied in both examples that John knew the explosion was going to happen right on time, yet the implication is a LOT easier to be seen in Example-2 with the facial expression John expresses; this being when they were in a stalemate, guns pointed at each other and ready to blow the other away at the same time. The added thought dialogue pointed out this fact better as well. It makes the "over-the-top action" more entertaining to read as well as gives more description of purpose; which in this case was why the heck the floor suddenly gave way from some explosion.

Now that we've gone over the examples, let's go into further detail in some of the writing techniques I used along with some further thought to "Action a Day Keeps Boredom Away,"


Over-the-top Action~ You know. Pyrotechnics, those big explosions, intense fighting scenes with lots of specific styles and moves used in blinding speed. This is all the stuff added to action packed stories for the thrill of the audience, or in this case the reader. While over-the-top action can make a great read, too much of it can degrade a story, and take away from the real relevance of the scene to the characters in question as far as plot development goes. So, it's good to use this technique well in moderation. There are several different kinds of over-the-top action techniques. The following is a list that describes many of these in detail, while also giving a good reference from any outside work(movie, TV show, cartoon, manga, ect.);
  • the Big Explosion- This is a pretty popular type of over-the-top action used to show the sheer magnitude of a massive explosion. These are good for finishing off rising action scenes at their peek(not to be confused with rising tension). A few examples include the rooftop explosion in "Die Hard", as well as the destruction of the 'Death Star' in "Star Wars: A New Hope".
  • the Complex Fight Scene- Not just a fight scene, but one that covers a variety of 'fighting moves' within the contents of the overall fight. This can be seen as easier to pull off when filming this on camera, yet with the write amount of description and the use of witty word play you can write a complex fight scene just as easily. You really have to go in detail with movement description while also trying to use witty word play to better visualize the scene, and provide better entertainment for the reader. A great example of complex fight scenes is in one of my favorite 'Kung Fu' movies, "Game of Death". The scene in particular takes place in a tall wooden building where "Billy" the hero of the movie played by Bruce Lee(among a couple other actors filling in) is trying to get to the top of it in order to find the main antagonist, Dr. Land in order to put an end to his mob organization. On each floor of this building Billy faces a different foe, each having a unique fighting style. There's several different moves that Billy has to use against each fighting style to defeat his opponents, making a very complex and entertaining fight scene. Let's not skip over the much more recent and much more mind bogglingly complex fight scene in "Inception". I'm of course referring to the scene where the character 'Arthur' is fighting against the 'projections' while gravity is consistently changing around completely. This scene took over-the-top to a new level, and while honestly it was pretty confusing and unbelievable it made up for it by being a stunning cinematic fight scene.
  • A Very Close Call- Where a character has a moment where they barely escape a fatal blow, or anything life threatening. This can happen in a very wide variety of ways. Perhaps your character just managed to bend down and pick something up just as a massive boulder zips over them that would have normally knocked them on their behind, or even knocked them out for good? It's just a suspense trick that can add some action to scenes not already action-packed. There are more than several examples of this. I can remember a scene from one of the Zoids series. As a person holding a long metal beam on the back of their shoulder was turning around, the main character bends down for some reason unintentionally avoiding a serious head injury. An example that was better played is in "Star Trek: First Contact" in a scene where 'Picard', captain of the Enterprise meets 'Lily', a character that was from a much earlier time period than the current-time setting of the movie, which as many should know is in the far future. Lily is understandably confused and frightened to find herself on a space traveling vessel that is far beyond her time period, and she tries to make her way off of it by taking a 'phaser' in her possession and using it to threaten someone into helping her off the ship. This leads to her bumping into Picard, who tries to calm her down with assuring words. After successfully doing this, he gets Lily to surrender the phaser and after she hands it to him, he verbally notes that the phaser was on its highest setting. Picard then explained that if he failed to stop her from firing the weapon, it would have vaporized him in one shot.
  • Sword Sparks- This can be a neat exaggeration on the strength of two apparently powerful foes while they are in a life struggle with bladed weapons. The exaggeration on their strength is shown as literal sparks fly from the edges of both of their weapons as they collide and slide against each other. Probably the most classic and notable example of this is with nearly every major fight scene of "the Highlander" series. An example of just sparks flying from metal on metal contact can be seen in a lot of Gundam series, as the giant robotic weapons crash into one another. It's also one of those 'Hollywood Myths' that bullets will cause sparks when shot at certain objects. Just another thought, I suppose.
  • Defenestration- The fancy term for the act of throwing, or being thrown through a window. It's a pretty simple yet potentially entertaining spectacle to put in an action scene. One of my favorite examples of this is in the Anime series "Cowboy Bebop" during the first seen-by-audience confrontation of the main character 'Spike' and one of the main antagonists, 'Vicious'. The confrontation is ended when Spike is thrown out of the church they're in through a glass window. In a slow motion shot, you see him fall with the tiny shards of glass everywhere and before he falls to the ground Vicious notices that Spike tossed a triggered grenade at him, officially ending the scene with a big explosion that wrecks the church(and Vicious as one would assume, in spite the fact that he returns later on the series).
  • Battle Amongst the Flames/in the Rain- This is where an epic battle takes place between foes as they are surrounded by flames. Battle in the rain, obviously happens while it's raining. In both cases, it makes for that added pizzazz you would want for a good action scene. The battle in flames is a difficult battle as it would be hard to try and escape from without getting torched. The battle in the rain is difficult as vision is an issue with all the water dripping down over the eyes of the character. A great and classic example of Battle Amongst the Flames is in the final battle of Disney's 'the Lion King'. After 'Simba' exchanges words with Scar, they duke it out and lightning strikes the ground causing flames to rise around them. A good example of Battle in the Rain is-YOU GUESSED IT!- "the Matirx: Revolutions which the scene in question is probably the most anti-climatic 'final battles'(and subsequently the worst example of such because of the whole "losing to win" deal). Yet, it is probably the best Battle in the Rain example for its stunning cinematic quality, at least. Even in a completely virtual world, the rain seems to be just cumbersome while fighting in it just like in the real world. There's even more over-the-top action as they make shock-waves visible from the impossibly strong punches and kicks that land on their target, actually showing rain droplets fly out in spheres around their bodies as they hit one another. More on final battles(and better examples of them) later.
  • Death- More specifically, the 'Mook Kill' where as Mook is the term given to disposable characters. Killing a character off in a scene can do a number of things. One, it can give the reader an example at how strong or rather how ruthless a battle or certain antagonist is. It can also give you chance to throw a little drama into your story, and give reason for your main character to go completely berserk on the antagonist(s). How important the character is that you kill off is entirely up to you, of course. Going back to 'the Matrix' series I'll go to an example of character death from my favorite installment, the first movie. For those of you who've watched, remember Apoc, Switch, Dozer, Mouse? While their deaths were very untimely and emotionally stirring, they were still pretty well played in developing the drama side of the action that played out as a result.

I'm sure there's more than a few other over-the-top action devices I could add to the list, but said list is pretty lengthy already. So, I'll just continue,
People talk about combining the Way of Learning with the Way of the Samurai,
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Only one Way, Takezo.

~Takuan Sōhō, Musashi
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Re: [DNP!...yet] PART II ADKeBA approach

PostPosted by kaidan K » Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:15 pm

the Bad-Ass / Big-Darn-Hero Factor~ Ahhh, yes. Do mind the language, as I feel term 'Bad-Ass' to be closest to the mark on this particular action genre characterization. The 'Bad-Ass' factor applies to the character, of course. To clarify, this factor does not always apply to characters in just the Action genre. I just figured it would make more sense to break it down and outline the details for it in this lesson as it fits mostly with the action genre. The bad-ass factor can make an action genre creative work more identifiable. Now what are the key things that define a character as a Bad-Ass? Well, I can tell you that it's mostly mentality. But in certain cases, simply the way a character looks can throw one into this category. A few material things like Chain Smoking/Smoking in general may add to the effect, but definitely are not key qualifications for the Bad-Ass category. Not on their own, at least. What it comes down to isn't even great physical strength by itself. Nor is it gender specific! The key qualities of a true 'Bad-Ass' are as follows,
  • Being calm when the world is blowing up- No matter what goes on or even if the character looses their temper for a moment, they still maintain their over all focus and a calm level of cool(or at least eventually snap-back to where they were after loosing it). For an example, I'm going back to "Die Hard". The main character, 'John McClane' gets pretty close to loosing it a couple times(like with the radio call to the cops via 'emergency channel') but overall he goes through the thick and thin throughout the entire movie trying to pacify the terrorist thieves situation. Even when the main antagonist 'Hans' takes the guy's wife hostage personally, John stays focused on the task at hand.
  • Go down fighting- They may not always have something to prove in a battle, yet true 'Bad-Asses' won't be taken down with out putting up some kind of fight. Case and point in the Lord of the Rings with Eowyen vs. the Black Captain(a.k.a, the Witch-King of Angmar). It's more of a surprise in the book with 'Dernhelm' turning out to be Eowyen, but said confrontation in both the book and the movie are well played with the action shown. Even though there was some help given by good ol' 'Merry' in actually slaying the menace, the chick was able to give the final blow to the Black Captain with a broken arm. Just slaying the Black Captain in a way defied the prophesy of 'Glorfindel' that clearly stated that the Witch-King was not going to fall by the hand of a man, which-if it wasn't sexist- could refer to 'man' as in just 'human'. Either way, she didn't let prophesy get in her way while givin' the Black Captain a good killin'. She's a total bad-ass!
  • Stick up for the little guy- Yes. This show of quality in a character should qualify them as bad-ass. Even when the rest of 'the group' is bringing the little guy down, the ultimate bad-ass brings them back up for good intentions or otherwise. Take a lesson from 'Iruka' from "Naruto" in this case. No matter what kind of mischief that pre-genin 'Naruto' got in trouble for, this guy is always there to take him to 'Ramen Ichiraku' after the boy served out his punishment. This is a show of friendship to Naruto that far surpasses any other seen in the beginning of the series. There is a little further drama in this, as Iruka reveals that his life without parents is a good reason why he feels so much empathy for the striving young ninja-to-be. Either way, Iruka takes the cake in this aspect of being a bad-asss.
  • Respect for the ladies/men- You don't typically see too many bad-asses in stories that won't treat the ladies with respect. It's more than respectable in most cases for someone to display a natural ability to cooperate with the opposite sex; it's bad-ass. 'Don Vito Corleone' from the ever so classic mobster hit, "the Godfather" is a decent example of this particular display of the bad-ass factor. He displays a high respect towards family, including the wife. Even better examples show characters that harbor such a respect for the ladies that they'll fight to protect them from harm when they see them threatened. Once again, Vito shows this quality as well- albeit indirectly- in the very beginning of the movie as one of the requests on the day of his daughter's wedding is to seek 'eye for an eye' justice against those who disrespected and even beat on the daughter of another man. Vito agrees to serve out this request by sending his henchman to do the dirty work, all in the name of respect for the ladies. For a good gender-swaped look at this, I go back to 'Eowyen' as she displayed plenty of respect for the men by fighting along side them in the battle for Gondor. In spite of showing disrespect to her father, a King no less by going to the battle against his orders, Eowyen still showed respect for her fellow man while riding with the Riders of Rohan. As her alias 'Dernhelm' she held her own on the long ride to Gondor, as well as taking up the responsibility of defending her father, 'Theoden' from being killed prematurely by the hand of the Black Captain. And of course we know how that confrontation ended up. Totally bad-ass!
  • Devious yet Sophisticated- This usually pertains to antagonists. It refers to someone who while they may be on the bad(or just chaotic) side of the alignment spectrum, they still have an air of highly civilized sophistication that is apparent in their actions and dialogue. They can, in spite of the alignment circumstances be reasoned with to a level not reachable by others of the same bad-assery. This in turn makes them bad-asses. For an antagonist example, 'Hans' from "Die Hard" reaches this level of bad-ass pretty well. A direct quote here can show this; "'And when Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept, for there were no more worlds to conquer.' Benefits of a classical education." This is the character's reaction to a simple model made by the company he was taking hostage of, as he displays an air of respect and even a bit of admiration for said company in their exploits. There is also the hint to Hans being very learned in very high-end brands of formal clothing given when he makes a comment noting the brand of suit that Mr. Takagi, the company CEO is wearing. For the protagonist side, Captain/Admiral 'Kirk' technically qualifies for this bad-ass trait as he is truly devious with his means to disobey Starcommand in every motion picture. The Star Trek reboot also shows Kirk(not quite Captain at first) as very devious in early life, on to his means of weaseling his way to becoming the next Captain of the Enterprise. While he's weaseling though, he does quite well in maintaining the focus and display of thorough knowledge expected of a fine Starfleet Captain. In fact without his weaseling, he would have not been there to get the Enterprise on the right track towards saving what was left the Vulcan race. Nor would the crew of the Enterprise gotten far in saving Earth without the further-albeit 'Future-Spock-aided'- weaseling to get back aboard and Captain the ship. All the while, he doesn't really lose his casually cool, yet detectably sophisticated demeanor. Not gonna lie. That is pretty bad-ass.
  • Big Heart in a Bigger Package- The Gentle Giant. They are large and in charge yet in spite of their massive size they have a heart the size of Texas, and don't try and put themselves off as being intimidating(intentionally that is, until the time calls for it). Constantly you see these characters tested for their 'big-heartedness', and they usually don't disappoint as they have a tendency to fall under the "Stick up for the Little Guy" as well. Size is a requirement, but so is the mentality. Great examples of this trait can be found in "Princess Bride" with the enormous 'Fezzik'. Even while being employed by the sinister Sicilian criminal Vizzini, the giant shows more than hints that he doesn't like the plans the Sicilian is using him for. Fezzik often shows wit and makes statements that while not entirely intellectually profound, still show the big, soft heart he carries. An even better example is 'Lian-Chu' in the much more recent animated flim, "Dragon Hunters". After he and his childhood friend, 'Gwizdo' land a gig slaying the "World Gobbler", they wind up finding the fairly naive little girl, Zoe join their crew as they journey to slay the dragon menace. While Lian-Chu doesn't want to encourage Zoe's 'fangirlism' and thinking that Gwizdo and himself are Knights, he struggles with crushing the girl's hopes and admiration for himself. If one thing could be said of Lian-Chu, it's this; even a bad-ass can knit.
  • Jack of All Trades- When a character in question has several talents, whether natural or trained and seem to be prepared for just about any situation because of this. Great examples would be 'Kakashi' from "Naruto" and 'Westley' from "Princess Bride". Kakashi just fits this billet so well in every tense situation when the life of his students, or even when the goal of the mission is on the line; he's just portrayed as the ultimate bad-ass. Westley as you see him as Dread Pirate Roberts not only knows how to use a sword, he can eventually overcome foes more than twice as big as him. He also has immunity to certain deadly poisons like, albeit fictitious 'Iocaine Powder'.

Now before this list gets too lengthy on its own, I'll list the non-key traits that while they don't hold on their own, still can easily be associated with a bad-ass character. They are as follows,
  • The Drug/Sex Vice- This is with bad-asses who have so much on their shoulders that they depend on particular drugs to let go their mental need to be tense. They ride the high of a cigarette, drown themselves with booze, or lay with easy women/men to put stress off their mind. The display of a vice like this can make a character more believable because of the sign of weakness towards accepting the vice rather than refuse it to try and change. This also makes the character easier to relate to by some readers. 'Marv' from "Sin City" is a good example of this as his major vice is intimacy with easy women as he lacks good self-confidence(largely due to his very rugged -practical "Phantom of the Opera" complex- looks). The real bad-ass trait he has is the "Respect for the ladies" one, but this weakness for women makes him more likeable as a character. An example of the drug vice can be found in the 'visual novel' "Clannad"(Anime). 'Akio' the father of the main heroine of the series, 'Nagisa' is always seen with a cigarette in his mouth(although not always lit). In the story, though he apparently quit his intended career because of his daughter's needs, which were in turn due to her seemingly incurable illness. As Nagisa went on to grow up into a woman, Aiko remains a consistent pillar of support for his daughter, especially with her issues with self-confidence. This of course qualifies as a "Stick up for the little guy" trait, making him a pretty bad-ass character, among other manly traits that put him in with the rest of the 'bad-ass crew'.
  • The Anti-Drug/Sex vice- Yes, even the polar opposite of the above is also a trait that can be seen in true bad-asses as well. Their high is gained in the satisfaction of their health as they refuse any mind altering drugs, or any other type of which would be considered self-inflicting on them. A great example of this is with 'Giran' of the humanoid-reptilian race 'Giras' in the popular Dragon Ball series. The first glimpse of him is in a bar where instead of asking for liquor or beer like the other patrons, he asks for a glass of milk. Granted, the "Go down fighting" trait is not shown when he fights the main protagonist 'Goku' in the Martial Arts tournament. Rather, it is shown later on in his life or death battle with the brutal and true antagonist 'Tambourine' as he gives the fight his all until Tambourine ultimately ends his life by forcing his hand through Giran's torso. It's okay, Giran. Even 'bad-asses' get revived by the Dragon Balls. A much better human example of this trait is 'Lee' played by 'Bruce Lee'(oddly enough) in "Enter the Dragon". Lee refuses almost every nicety offered to him, including liquor and 'easy' women. It's pretty clear in the movie that he refuses these because he has a duty to commit to in trying to bring the main antagonist to justice for drugs and human trafficking. Of course, it can also be assumed that Lee also naturally refuses such niceties as part of his moral code, as 'Lee' is kind of the film representation of how Bruce Lee was in real life(minus the secret agent part). His refusal towards the easy women marks him a "Respect the ladies" kind of bad-ass.
  • Great Feat of Will/Resilience- Sometimes it seems that it's just the sheer will to live that drives a character to pull off the impossible. Even when they've gone down in battle, they still cling on to life in spite of the severe wounds they have received. Since this card is played so often, and with so many different types of character that kind of disqualifies it as being a real key identifier for the bad-ass factor. Doesn't take away from adding to any key identifiers. A good example would be 'Farimir' if I may go back to "the Lord of The Rings". He ends up being badly wounded on a suicide mission to try and reclaim 'Osgiliath' and repel the 'Sauron's' forces. While things look fairly grim for him, he still hangs on to life until he is ultimately healed by 'Aragorn'. Once more in "Princess Bride" we find this trait in 'Westley' as even though he went through torture that would have completely killed any other man as you can imagine, he ever so barely hangs on to the very last fiber of life left in him. He goes on later in the story to make a dire act of will to oppose the antagonist 'Prince Humperdinck' by threatening the devious man with brutality if he doesn't let Buttercup and himself go free.
  • The Intimidating Catchphrase- Some characters use this technique as a common identifier for one of many bad-asses. "You've got to ask yourself a question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya punk?" This is from the classic hit cop movie, "Dirty Harry" starring Clint Eastwood as '"Dirty" Harry Callahan'. Harry is an Inspector and a veteran cop who has a fairly abrasive personality and a taste for using high powered weapons, namely the 44. Magnum. He pulls this catchphrase out after gaining the advantage in a shoot out, leaving the perp. reaching for their weapon to defend themselves. The first time he pulls out this phrase, he ends up intimidating the perp. into giving up in spite the fact that he used up all his rounds in the initial shoot out. The second time however, the main antagonist perp. goes for his gun anyway finding out that Harry still had one bullet left... the hard way. Another example is in the "Die Hard" series as a whole and was already shown in the examples of this lesson. "Yipee-ki-yay," is 'John McClane's reaction in every movie to someone referring to him as a 'Cowboy'. You can see that I used the catchphrase in the examples in a fairly similar context to how it's used in the first movie. In the first movie, the line is used when John is referred to as a 'Cowboy', and then the saying just stuck in the rest of the movies. Just another way for a bad-ass to express themselves.

Now let's finally breakdown the Big-Darn-Hero aspect of a typical action genre creative work. Once again, heroes are by no means limited to the action genre. I'm outlining them here as there usually is at least action genre scenes associated with the Big-Darn-Hero characterization even in dramas and otherwise. There are a few different things that qualify a character as a Big-Darn-Hero. Let me list them and give some good examples,
  • There at just the right moment- Right off the bat, this is one of the calling cards for all major heroes. In just about any dire time when things looks hopeless, from out of no where the Big-Darn-Hero appears to save the day. It could be when everyone else is running away from or battling against tough antagonists/protagonists, and the Big-Darn-Hero is enough to turn the tides in favor of their side. Notice how this factor isn't one sided? There's examples of both sides of the alignment spectrum having Big-Darn-Hero moments. Case in point, 'Zechs Merquise' from one of my favorite 'Gundam' series, "Gundam Wing". We see this particular antagonist show his remarkable heroism in the first episode no less, where he takes on the Wing Gundam on his own with a mobile suit vastly inferior to the foe's. Granted, his heroism much later in the series is less to be seen in his actions, yet that doesn't stop him from being chalked down as an antagonist Big-Darn-Hero. As far as protagonists go, there's several to choose from. So why not go with the classics? 'Superman' from the series named after him, is probably the best example of this factor. Right when things get out of hand, cue the dramatic music for the 'Man of Steel' as he zooms in and kicks butt out of pretty much anyone.
  • Take one for the World- An action that is performed by many a hero. It stems from the root statement 'Take one for the team' only in this case it is on a much bigger scale for just the word 'team'. Say there's a catastrophe about to happen that only one person can stop. The catch is simple; that person has to sacrifice their life or their chances of survival are just slim to none. I could bring up "Matrix: Revolutions" again. An example I personally like better goes back to "the Lord of the Rings" with the hobbit 'Frodo Baggins' taking the responsibility of destroying 'the One Ring' in order to finally rid 'Middle Earth' of the powerful and menacing main antagonist, 'Sauron'. He almost fails in his task as the Ring's power overtook him in the end, yet it still wouldn't have been inside Mt. Doom at the time if the poor guy hadn't journeyed practically halfway across the world to get it there. Let's consider the movie "Armageddon" as well. Maybe not the best catastrophe thriller movie, but there is a perfect example of "Take one for the World" as 'Harry Stamper'(played by Bruce Willis) sabotages the space-suit of the character 'A.J.' just to take the responsibility of detonating the bomb they just put on the Texas-sized asteroid himself. It has to be done manually due to technical difficulties, and Harry makes it clear that he's going to be that freeking guy to stay behind and sacrifice his life for the sake of all life on planet Earth. Such a Big-Darn-Hero, eh?
  • No Matter the Cost- A Big-Darn-Hero can be seen in scenes where there is a major goal to achieve, and someone rises to step up to finish the struggle. After all, somebody's got to hold the line or all is lost(at least in most cases 'all'). Historic War stories show someone like this quite often, whether it is displayed as a glorification of that person in history or completely accurate of their real life demeanor. 'Brigadier General Armistead' in "Gettysburg" is a great example of 'No Matter the Cost'. "Virginians! Virginians! For your land - for your homes - for your sweethearts - for your wives - for Virginia! Forward... march!" he says to rally his troops. Armistead leads his them on their push towards the Union army with the ideals of the Confederacy on the line that they must defend no matter the cost. Of course the charge led by Armistead is too small to overtake the Union army, and they are utterly defeated. Even a Big-Darn-Hero faces defeat. Something to keep in mind while role playing.

There's more to cover on Heroes, per say. Yet I think I'm going to leave the rest of it for another lesson topic. Let's move on,
People talk about combining the Way of Learning with the Way of the Samurai,
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but when properly combined, they aren't two-they're one.
Only one Way, Takezo.

~Takuan Sōhō, Musashi
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kaidan K
Blind Justice
 
Posts: 469
Joined: Thu Mar 25, 2010 5:51 pm
Location: Over the Hybrid Rainbow
Gender: Male


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